Emerald Mutual Funds Close

Disclosure

Emerald Growth Fund Principal Risks

Any of the investments made by the Fund can result in an investment loss, which may be significant. The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value and total return, are:

Equity Securities:

The risks associated with investing in equity securities of companies include the financial risk of selecting individual companies that do not perform as anticipated, the risk that the stock markets in which the Fund invests may experience periods of turbulence and instability, and the general risk that domestic and global economies may go through periods of decline and cyclical change.

Portfolio Turnover:

The Fund is generally expected to engage in frequent and active trading of portfolio securities to achieve its investment objective. A higher turnover rate (100% or more) will involve correspondingly greater transaction costs, which will be borne directly by the Fund, may have an adverse impact on performance, and may increase the potential for more taxable distributions being paid to shareholders, including short-term capital gains that are taxed at ordinary income rates. To the extent a Fund engages in short sales (which are not included in calculating the portfolio turnover rate), the transaction costs incurred by a Fund are likely to be greater than the transaction costs incurred by a mutual fund that does not take short positions and has a similar portfolio turnover rate.

Small and Medium Capitalization Stocks:

Investment in securities of smaller companies presents greater investment risks than investing in the securities of larger companies. These risks include greater price volatility, greater sensitivity to changing economic conditions, and less liquidity than the securities of larger, more mature companies.

Please see "Discussion of Principal and Non-Principal Risks" in the Fund's prospectus for a more detailed description of the risks of investing in the Fund. It is possible to lose money on an investment in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.

Emerald Banking & Finance Fund Principal Risks

Any of the investments made by the Fund can result in an investment loss, which may be significant. The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value and total return, are:

Allocation:

The Fund's investment performance depends on how its assets are allocated and reallocated among particular underlying Emerald Funds according to the Fund's allocation targets and ranges. Emerald Management may make less than optimal or poor asset allocation decisions, meaning that the Fund could miss attractive investment opportunities by underweighting markets that subsequently experience significant returns and could lose value by overweighting markets that subsequently experience significant declines.

Securities Issued by Other Investment Companies:

The Fund may invest in shares of other investment companies to gain exposure to a particular portion of the market rather than purchase securities directly. Investing in the underlying funds exposes the Fund to all the risks of the underlying funds (as detailed below), and, in general, subjects it to a pro rata portion of the underlying funds' fees and expenses.

The Fund is exposed to the same risks as the Underlying Funds in which the Fund invests in direct proportion to the allocation of its assets among the Underlying Funds. The following principal risks are principal risks of the Underlying Funds which in the aggregate also constitute principal risks of the Fund by virtue of its investment in the Underlying Funds.

Depositary Receipts:

Investments in depositary receipts involve risks similar to those accompanying direct investments in foreign securities. In addition, there is risk involved in investing in unsponsored depositary receipts, as there may be less information available about the underlying issuer than there is about an issuer of sponsored depositary receipts and the prices of unsponsored depositary receipts may be more volatile than those of sponsored depositary receipts.

Derivatives:

The market value of the derivative instruments in which the Fund may invest, including options, futures contracts, forward currency contracts, swap agreements and other similar instruments, may be more volatile than that of other instruments. When investing in derivatives for hedging purposes, certain additional transaction costs may be accrued that may reduce the Fund's performance. In addition, there can be no assurance given that each derivative position will achieve a perfect correlation with the security or currency against which it is being hedged, or that a particular derivative position will be available when sought by Emerald Management and/or the Fund's sub-advisor.

Emerging Market and Frontier Market Securities:

Emerging market and frontier market securities present greater investment risks than investing in the securities of U.S. companies. These risks include a greater likelihood of economic, political or social instability, less liquid and more volatile stock markets, foreign exchange controls, a lack of government regulation and different legal systems, and immature economic structures.

Equity Securities:

The risks associated with investing in equity securities of companies include the financial risk of selecting individual companies that do not perform as anticipated, the risk that the stock markets in which the Fund invests may experience periods of turbulence and instability, and the general risk that domestic and global economies may go through periods of decline and cyclical change.

Tax:

The federal income tax treatment of the complex securities in which the Fund may invest may not be clear or may be subject to recharacterization by the Internal Revenue Service ("IRS"). It could be more difficult to comply with the tax requirements applicable to regulated investment companies if the tax characterization of investments or the tax treatment of the income from such investments were successfully challenged by the IRS. Any such failure to comply with the rules applicable to regulated investment companies could make it more difficult for the Fund itself to comply with such rules.

Please see "Discussion of Principal and Non-Principal Risks" in the Fund's prospectus for a more detailed description of the risks of investing in the Fund. It is possible to lose money on an investment in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a deposit of a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.

Emerald Insights Fund Principal Risks

Any of the investments made by the Fund can result in an investment loss, which may be significant. The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value and total return, are:

Equity Securities

The risks associated with investing in equity securities of companies include the financial risk of selecting individual companies that do not perform as anticipated, the risk that the stock markets in which the Fund invests may experience periods of turbulence and instability, and the general risk that domestic and global economies may go through periods of decline and cyclical change.

Small and Medium Capitalization Stocks

Investment in securities of small or medium-sized companies presents greater investment risks than investing in the securities of larger companies. These risks include greater price volatility, greater sensitivity to changing economic conditions, and less liquidity than the securities of larger, more mature companies.

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund is generally expected to engage in frequent and active trading of portfolio securities to achieve its investment objective. A higher turnover rate (100% or more) will involve correspondingly greater transaction costs, which will be borne directly by the Fund, may have an adverse impact on performance, and may increase the potential for more taxable distributions being paid to shareholders, including short-term capital gains that are taxed at ordinary income rates. To the extent the Fund engages in short sales (which are not included in calculating the portfolio turnover rate), the transaction costs incurred by the Fund are likely to be greater than the transaction costs incurred by a mutual fund that does not take short positions and has a similar portfolio turnover rate.

Growth Stocks

Growth-oriented stocks may be more sensitive to changes in current or expected earnings than other stocks. The market prices of companies believed to have good prospects for revenues and earnings growth tend to reflect those expectations. When it appears those expectations will not be met, the prices of these securities typically fall. In addition, if the market does not come to share the Adviser's assessment of an investment's long-term growth, the Fund may underperform other mutual funds or stock indexes.

Liquidity Risk

Liquidity risk is financial risk due to uncertain liquidity. An institution might lose liquidity if its credit rating falls, it experiences sudden unexpected cash outflows, or some other event causes counterparties to avoid trading with or lending to the institution. A firm is also exposed to liquidity risk if markets on which it depends are subject to loss of liquidity. Derivative based securities and privately issued mortgage-related securities and other asset-backed securities, which do not have a government or government-sponsored guarantee, that are subject to substantial market and credit risk may have greater liquidity risk. Less liquid securities may trade infrequently, trade at a smaller volume, and be quite volatile. This means that they may be harder to purchase or sell at a fair price or quickly enough to prevent or minimize loss.

Real Estate Securities and REITs

Real estate investment trusts or "REITs" are issuers that invest in interests in real estate, including mortgages. Investing in REITs may subject the Fund to risks similar to those associated with the direct ownership of real estate, including fluctuations in the value of underlying properties and defaults by borrowers or tenants. REITs may not be diversified and are subject to heavy cash flow dependency and self-liquidation. REITs are also subject to the possibilities of failing to qualify for tax-free pass through of income under the Code, and failing to maintain their exemptions from registration under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the "1940 Act"). REITs may have limited financial resources, trade less frequently and in a limited volume, and be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than more widely held securities.

Restricted and Illiquid Securities

Certain securities generally trade in lower volume and may be less liquid than securities of large established companies. These less liquid securities could include securities of small- and mid-sized non-U.S. companies, high-yield securities, convertible securities, unrated debt and convertible securities, securities that originate from small offerings, and foreign securities, particularly those from companies in emerging markets.  If a security is illiquid, the Fund may not be able to sell the security at a time and/or price at which the Adviser might wish to sell, which means that the Fund could lose money. In addition, the security could have the effect of decreasing the overall level of the Fund's liquidity.

Securities Issued By Other Investment Companies

The Fund may invest in shares of other investment companies, including, but not limited to, other mutual funds, money market funds, ETFs, HOLDRs, unit investment trusts, and closed-end funds, to gain exposure to a particular portion of the market rather than purchase securities directly. Investing in another investment company exposes the Fund to all the risks of that investment company, and, in general, subjects it to a pro rata portion of the other investment company's fees and expenses.

Managed Portfolio Risk

The Adviser's investment strategies or choice of specific securities may be unsuccessful and may cause the Fund to incur losses.

Please see "What are the Principal and Non-Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund?" for a more detailed description of the risks of investing in the Fund. It is possible to lose money on an investment in the Fund. Investments in the Fund are not deposits or obligations of any bank, are not endorsed or guaranteed by any bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the U.S. government, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Federal Reserve Board or any other government agency. 

Emerald Small Cap Value Fund Principal Risks

Any of the investments made by the Fund can result in an investment loss, which may be significant. The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value and total return, are:

Equity Securities

The risks associated with investing in equity securities of companies include the financial risk of selecting individual companies that do not perform as anticipated, the risk that the stock markets in which the Fund invests may experience periods of turbulence and instability, and the general risk that domestic and global economies may go through periods of decline and cyclical change.

Small Capitalization Stocks

Investment in securities of small or medium-sized companies presents greater investment risks than investing in the securities of larger companies. These risks include greater price volatility, greater sensitivity to changing economic conditions, and less liquidity than the securities of larger, more mature companies. The trading volume of securities of smaller companies is normally less than that of larger companies and, therefore, may disproportionately affect their market price, tending to make prices fall more in response to selling pressure than is the case with larger companies. Smaller companies may also have limited markets, product lines, or financial resources, and may lack management experience.

Foreign Securities Risk

The Fund may invest in American Depositary Receipts (ADRs). ADRs are certificates evidencing ownership of shares of a foreign-based issuer held in trust by a bank or similar financial institution. They are alternatives to the direct purchase of the underlying securities in their national markets and currencies. ADRs are subject to risks similar to those associated with direct investment in foreign securities. Foreign investments can involve significant risks in addition to the risks inherent in U.S. investments. Such risks include adverse political and economic developments or social instability; the imposition of foreign withholding taxes or exchange controls; expropriation or nationalization; currency blockage (which could prevent cash from being brought back to the United States); the impact of exchange rate and foreign currency fluctuations on the market value of foreign securities; more limited availability of public information regarding security issuers; the degree of governmental supervision regarding securities markets; different accounting, auditing and financial standards; and difficulties in enforcing legal rights (particularly with regard to depository receipts in which the holders may not have the same rights as shareholders).

Value Stocks

Value investing attempts to identify companies selling at a discount to their intrinsic value. Value investing is subject to the risk that a company’s intrinsic value may never be fully realized by the market or that a company judged by the Adviser to be undervalued may actually be appropriately priced.

Geographic Risk

Funds that are less diversified across countries or geographic regions are generally riskier than more geographically diversified funds. Because the Fund’s investments may be in a limited number of countries, it is more exposed to those countries’ or regions’ economic cycles, currency exchange rates, stock market valuations and political risks compared with a more geographically diversified fund.

Depositary Receipts Risk

Depositary receipts are securities issued by banks and other financial institutions that represent interests in the stocks of foreign companies. They include, but are not limited to, American Depositary Receipts, European Depositary Receipts, Global Depositary Receipts, Russian Depositary Certificates, Philippine Depositary Receipts, and Brazilian Depositary Receipts. Depositary receipts may be sponsored or unsponsored. Unsponsored depositary receipts are organized independently, without the cooperation of the issuer of the underlying securities. As a result, there may be less information available about the underlying issuer than there is about an issuer of sponsored depositary receipts and the prices may be more volatile than if such instruments were sponsored by the issuer. Investments in depositary receipts involve risks similar to those accompanying direct investments in foreign securities. 

Sector Risk

Sector risk is the possibility that all stocks within the same group of industries will decline in price due to sector-specific market or economic developments. The Fund may be overweight in certain sectors at various times.

Managed Portfolio Risk

The Adviser's investment strategies or choice of specific securities may be unsuccessful and may cause the Fund to incur losses.

Non-Diversification Risk

The Fund is "non-diversified," which means that it may own larger positions in a smaller number of securities than funds that are "diversified." This means that an increase or decrease in the value of a single security likely will have a greater impact on the Fund’s net asset value and total return than a diversified fund.

Real Estate Securities and REITs

Real estate investment trusts or "REITs" are issuers that invest in interests in real estate, including mortgages. Investing in REITs may subject the Fund to risks similar to those associated with the direct ownership of real estate, including fluctuations in the value of underlying properties and defaults by borrowers or tenants. REITs may not be diversified and are subject to heavy cash flow dependency and self-liquidation. REITs are also subject to the possibilities of failing to qualify for tax-free pass through of income under the Code, and failing to maintain their exemptions from registration under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the "1940 Act"). REITs may have limited financial resources, trade less frequently and in a limited volume, and be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than more widely held securities.

Please see "What are the Principal and Non-Principal Risks of Investing in the Fund?" for a more detailed description of the risks of investing in the Fund. It is possible to lose money on an investment in the Fund. Investments in the Fund are not deposits or obligations of any bank, are not endorsed or guaranteed by any bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the U.S. government, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Federal Reserve Board or any other government agency. 

EMERALD SELECT trueLIBERTY INCOME FUND PRINCIPAL RISKS

Any of the investments made by the Fund can result in an investment loss, which may be significant. The principal risks of investing in the Fund, which could adversely affect its net asset value and total return, are:

Cash and Cash Equivalents

The holding by the Fund of a substantial portion of its assets in cash and/or cash equivalents such as money market securities, U.S. government obligations and short-term debt securities, which may occur under certain market conditions, could have a negative effect on the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective.

Derivatives

The Fund may invest in derivatives, which are securities whose value is based on the value of another security or index. These instruments include options, futures contracts, forward currency contracts, swap agreements, and similar instruments.

The market value of derivative instruments and securities may be more volatile than that of other instruments, and each type of derivative instrument may have its own special risks, including the risk of mispricing or improper valuation of derivatives and the inability of derivatives to correlate perfectly with underlying assets, rates, and indexes. Many derivatives, in particular privately negotiated derivatives, are complex and often valued subjectively. Improper valuations can result in increased cash payment requirements to counterparties or a loss of value to a Fund.

Concentration Risk – Energy Infrastructure Companies

Any fund that concentrates in a particular segment of the market will generally be more volatile than a fund that invests more broadly. The Fund will invest 25% or more of its assets, directly or indirectly through derivatives held by the Subsidiary, in the energy infrastructure industry. Any market price movements, regulatory or technological changes, or economic conditions affecting energy infrastructure companies may have a significant impact on the Fund’s performance. In particular, energy infrastructure companies can be affected by general or local economic conditions and political developments, changes in regulations, environmental problems, casualty losses, and changes in interest rates. Additional risks inherent in energy infrastructure companies include, but are not limited to: risks associated with sustained declines in demand for crude oil, natural gas and refined petroleum products, construction risk, acquisition risk, changes in the regulatory environment or other regulatory exposure, weather risk, risks associated with terrorist activity and interest rate risks.

Equity Securities Risk

MLP common units and other equity securities may be affected by macro-economic and other factors affecting the stock market in general, including without limitation, expectations of interest rates, investor sentiment towards the natural resources sector, changes in an issuer’s financial condition, and poor performance of a particular issuer.

Exchange-Traded Notes Risk

The value of an exchange-traded note or ETN is subject to the credit risk of the issuer. There may not be an active trading market available for some ETNs. Additionally, trading of ETNs may be halted or the ETN may be delisted by the listing exchange.

Foreign Securities Risk

The Fund may invest, directly or indirectly through the Subsidiary, in securities of foreign issuers. Foreign investments can involve significant risks in addition to the risks inherent in U.S. investments. Such risks include adverse political and economic developments or social instability; the imposition of foreign withholding taxes or exchange controls; expropriation or nationalization; currency blockage (which could prevent cash from being brought back to the United States); the impact of exchange rate and foreign currency fluctuations on the market value of foreign securities; more limited availability of public information regarding security issuers; the degree of governmental supervision regarding securities markets; different accounting, auditing and financial standards; and difficulties in enforcing legal rights (particularly with regard to depository receipts in which the holders may not have the same rights as shareholders).

Emerging Markets Risk

To the extent that the Fund or Subsidiary invests in issuers located in emerging markets, the risk of loss may be heightened by political changes and changes in taxation or currency controls that could adversely affect the values of these investments. Emerging markets have been more volatile than the markets of developed countries with more mature economies.

Liquidity and Valuation Risk

Certain MLP securities may trade less frequently than those of larger companies due to their smaller capitalizations. In the event certain MLP securities experience limited trading volumes, the prices of such MLPs may display abrupt or erratic movements at times. Additionally, it may be more difficult for the Fund to buy and sell significant amounts of such securities without an unfavorable impact on prevailing market prices.

Managed Portfolio Risk

The Adviser’s investment strategies or choice of specific securities may be unsuccessful and may cause the Fund to incur losses.

MLP Risks

Investments in securities of MLPs involve risks that differ from investments in common stock including risks related to limited control and limited rights to vote on matters affecting the MLP, risks related to potential conflicts of interest between the MLP and the MLP’s general partner, cash flow risks. MLP common units and other equity securities can be affected by macro-economic and other factors affecting the stock market in general, expectations of interest rates, investor sentiment towards MLPs or the energy sector, changes in a particular issuer’s financial condition, or unfavorable or unanticipated poor performance of a particular issuer (in the case of MLPs, generally measured in terms of distributable cash flow).

MLP Tax Risks

MLPs are treated as partnerships for U.S. federal income tax purposes and do not pay U.S. federal income tax at the partnership level. Rather, each partner is allocated a share of the MLP’s income, gains, losses, deductions and expenses. A change in current tax law, or a change in the underlying business mix of a given MLP, could result in an MLP being treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, which would result in such MLP being subject to U.S. federal income tax on its taxable income. The classification of an MLP as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes would have the effect of reducing the amount of cash available for distribution by the MLP.

Deferred Tax Liability

Cash distributions from an MLP to the Fund that exceed the Fund’s allocable share of such MLP’s net taxable income are considered a tax-deferred return of capital that will reduce the Fund’s adjusted tax basis in the equity securities of the MLP. These reductions in such Fund’s adjusted tax basis in the MLP equity securities will increase the amount of gain (or decrease the amount of loss) recognized by the Fund on a subsequent sale of such MLP equity securities. For financial statement purposes, the Fund will accrue deferred income taxes for any future tax liability associated with (i) that portion of MLP distributions considered to be a tax-deferred return of capital as well as (ii) capital appreciation of its investments. Upon the sale of an MLP security, the Fund may be liable for previously deferred taxes. The Fund will rely to some extent on information provided by the MLPs, which may not be provided on a timely basis, to estimate the Fund’s deferred tax liability for purposes of financial statement reporting and determining its net asset value (“NAV”). From time to time, the Adviser will modify the estimates or assumptions regarding the Fund’s deferred tax liability as new information becomes available. The Fund will generally compute deferred income taxes based on the highest federal income tax rate applicable to corporations (currently 35%) and an assumed rate attributable to state or local taxes. The daily estimate of the Fund’s deferred tax liability may vary substantially from the Fund’s actual tax liability. Modifications of estimates or assumptions, changes in generally accepted accounting principles or changes in applicable tax law could result in increases or decreases in the Fund’s NAV per share, which could be material.

Potential Substantial After-Tax Tracking Error from Index Performance

The Fund will be subject to taxation on its taxable income. The NAV of Fund Shares will also be reduced by the accrual of any deferred tax liabilities. The Index, however, is calculated without any deductions for taxes. As a result, the Fund’s after tax performance could differ significantly from the Index even if the pretax performance of the Fund and the performance of the Index are closely correlated.

Returns of Capital Distributions From the Fund Reduce the Tax Basis of Fund Shares

A portion of the Fund’s distributions are expected to be treated as a return of capital for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Returns of capital distribution are not taxable income to you but reduce your tax basis in your Fund Shares. Such a reduction in tax basis will result in larger taxable gains and/or lower tax losses on a subsequent sale of Fund Shares.

Shareholders who periodically receive the payment of dividends or other distributions consisting of a return of capital may be under the impression that they are receiving net profits from the Fund when, in fact, they are not. Shareholders should not assume that the source of the distributions is from the net profits of the Fund.

New Fund Risk

The Fund was recently formed and therefore has limited performance history for investors to evaluate.

New Sub-Adviser Risk

The Sub-Adviser is a newly-formed and newly-registered investment adviser, and has limited experience managing a registered investment company.

Non-Diversified Risk

An underlying investment (such as another fund) in which the Fund invests that is non-diversified may invest a larger percentage of its assets in a given security than a diversified fund. As a result, it may be more susceptible to a single adverse economic, political or regulatory occurrence affecting one or more issuers in which a large percentage of its assets is invested and may experience increased volatility due to its investments in those securities.

Options Risk

When the Fund purchases an option on a security it may lose the entire premium paid if the underlying security does not decrease in value. The Fund is also exposed to default by the option writer who may be unwilling or unable to perform its contractual obligations to the Fund.

Securities Issued By Other Investment Companies

A Fund may invest in shares of other investment companies, including, but not limited to, other mutual funds, money market funds, ETFs, HOLDRs, unit investment trusts, and closed-end funds, to gain exposure to a particular portion of the market rather than purchase securities directly. Investing in another investment company exposes a Fund to all the risks of that investment company, and, in general, subjects it to a pro rata portion of the other investment company’s fees and expenses.

Small and Medium Capitalization Stocks

Investment in securities of small or medium-sized companies presents greater investment risks than investing in the securities of larger companies. These risks include greater price volatility, greater sensitivity to changing economic conditions, and less liquidity than the securities of larger, more mature companies.

Subsidiary Risk

By investing in the Subsidiary, the Fund is indirectly exposed to the risks associated with the Subsidiary’s investments. There can be no assurance that the investment objective of the Subsidiary will be achieved. In addition, the Subsidiary is not registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the “1940”) Act, and, unless otherwise noted in this Prospectus, is not subject to all of the investor protections of the 1940 Act. In addition, changes in the laws of the United States and/or the Cayman Islands could result in the inability of the Fund and/or the Subsidiary to operate as described in this Prospectus and the statement of additional information and could adversely affect the Fund.

Swap Contract Risk

The Fund may, directly or indirectly through the Subsidiary, enter into total return swap contracts, and related instruments. Each swap exposes the Fund and/or Subsidiary to the risk that a counterparty may become bankrupt or otherwise fail to perform its obligations due to financial difficulties. Total return swaps are also subject to the particular risk that the swaps could result in losses if the underlying asset or reference does not perform as anticipated.

cont
Close Button Emerald Mutual Funds

Address:

P.O. Box 8556
Denver, CO 80201

Overnight Address:

1290 Broadway, Suite 1000
Denver, CO 80203

E-mail:

emeraldmutualfunds@alpsinc.com

Telephone:

Emerald Mutual Funds: (855) 828-9909

Emerald Broker Services: (800) 722-4123